How to Find Your Niche

How to Find Your Niche

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You need to niche.

A niche is a community of people who share similar ideals.

And it’s your best friend.

Here’s why...

You Can’t Market to Everyone

Think about it…

There are completely different reasons why a 20 year old woman wants to buy something than a 50 year old woman.

You can’t talk to both of them the same way.

If you’re trying to do that, you’re not going to attract either of them.

You have to pick one and double down on it.

The Power of Niching

Niching is doubling down.

Spending more time and money on the people who you really want to work with.

And it works.

When you market to everyone, you’re a small fish in a big pond. There’s a thousand people just like you and you’re no different than the rest.

It’s hard to break out from all the noise.

When you double down on your people, you become a big fish in a small pond. You’re the only person in your niche. You’re the go-to person. You pop into people’s minds first.

Your marketing becomes easy.

The Fear of Niching

I get it. It’s scary to niche.

You’re worried about reducing your audience and your sales.

Here’s something to consider: even apple and Starbucks niche.

Think about Apple or Starbucks. These are huge companies that actually do have everyone as their customers. But they don’t market to everyone.

They try to attract very specific customer profiles. They know the demographics (age, location, marital status) and psychographics (interests, hobbies) of their customers.

They direct their marketing copy and dollars toward these targeted customer profiles.

Everyone else is gravy.

Pick Your Niche

If you already have customers, pick three examples of people who are your dream clients. Think about what they have in common.

If you don’t have customers yet, pick three examples of people you’d like to work with. And reevaluate once you do have customers to make sure you’re on the right track.

You can think about which clients spend the most, which are underserved in their market, or which ones bring the most referrals.

Or which ones you like working with the most.

One thing to keep in mind: there’s no such thing as too niche.

So don’t worry about that.

Learn About Your People

The best way to learn about your customers is with a customer profile.

It’s a breakdown of your dream client.

You want to know basic information like name, age, gender, location, education, interests, etc.

You also need to go a step further and think about them as a friend. You’ll be spending a lot of time with them in your business, so get to know them. Where do they shop? What kind of shows do they like?

And you need to know what problem they have so that you can solve it.

Read More: How to Build a Customer Profile

Turn Your Niche into a Brand

Now that you have a niche, it’s time to build everything around that.

You’ll build an entire brand around them: your name, colors, fonts, images.

You’ll build all your marketing about them: your website copy, blog posts, social media captions, email newsletters.

You’ll need to speak to them in their language. You’ll need to talk about things they care about. You’ll need to solve their specific problems.

Read More: How to Build a Brand That Attracts Your Audience

My Niche

When I started my law firm, I didn’t have a niche. I was an attorney for small businesses.

I was a small fish in a big pond. There were a thousand small business lawyers. And nothing made me different from the rest. There was no reason for anyone to work with me out of all the other options. My marketing wasn’t working. And I didn’t have many clients.

I decided to niche, and I picked the clients I liked working with the most: women.

They also happened to be an underserved market, as most law firms aren’t catering to women-owned small businesses.

And I built my whole business around modern women.

It was in the branding: we picked Sprout Law because plants evoke a feminine theme and it referred to helping people grow a business, we added pink touches to the website, we picked simple and clean fonts, and we only used images of women. And it was in the marketing copy: we talk about the inequalities that women face in business and we talk about the Bachelorette.

When I doubled down on my people, I was a big fish in a small pond. I was the only lawyer in my niche. So I became the first name that popped into my audience’s mind. When they or their friends were starting a small business, they thought of me. They recommended me.

My marketing took on a life of its own and started bringing in clients.

We became famous in a women’s group in Omaha. We were mentioned at a large social media conference in Brooklyn. I’d never met any of these people before.

They knew me because I was the go-to person in my space.

Takeaways

  1. Find your three dream clients

  2. Learn all about them

  3. Build your brand around them

 

 

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Nicole SwartzBrand